Ful Feir Flour

Trinity College Cambridge, MS B.14.39, fol.25v

Used with kind permission
of the Master and Fellows of Trinity College Cambridge.


[1] Ful feir flour is þe lilie;
Wið fif leuis hire sal hulie
fif to bere[n] hire is ful imu[n]de;
for þat is hire p[ro]p[r]e cunde

[5] þat first bitokenit charite;
to louen þin louer more þe[n] þe
við worð. við horte. við al þi mist; [1]
for þat is treve loue arist.

after þis lef; is þer on oþir;
[10] Þu loue wel þi[n]ne broþir
⁊ þin ewe cristene asse þi selve;
for so dude[n] þe apostles tuelve
þus is vrite[n] i[n] þe gospelle;
mi[n] suete vre[n]d asse ic ou telle
[15] diliges d[omi]n[u]m d[eu]m t[uum]. [etc.]

Trinity College Cambridge, MS B.14.39, fol.25v

Used with kind permission
of the Master and Fellows of Trinity College Cambridge.


þat þridde. bit[okenit]. riswisnesse;
þat  þu sal here[n] mati[n]s ⁊ messe
mone ⁊ si[n]ne firsake[n];
⁊ to iesu  þu salt take[n]
[20] al þis wordis  þrude;
orf. ⁊ lond. ⁊ lude.
n[isi] q[ui]s renu[n]ciaverit o[mn]ia q[ue] p[ossi]d[et]

þat ferþe deit ou vnd[er]sto[n]de[n]
to seruen crist wid feið. [2] ⁊ ho[n]de[n]
[25] to firsake[n] t[ri]cherie;
prude ⁊ oude ⁊ lecherie
no[n] mo[n] ne sal oþ[er] missige[n]
sigge vad he ou sigge
Q[uid]c[umque]; dixerit fr[atr]i suo raca [etc.];

Trinity College Cambridge, MS B.14.39, fol.25v

Used with kind permission
of the Master and Fellows of Trinity College Cambridge.


[30] Þat fifte lef of þisse viwe
teket mo[n] i[n] þisse liue
forte hem scriue[n] [3]
þat þu neuer for þi sine
þo vonie wid Satanasses cu[n]ne
[35] To helle ne be idriue þat is dimme
mo[n] have rouþe of þe one
for þi lif nis boten alone.

We[n] þu sinnekis þu mast dreden
Wid þi fleisc woremes to feden
[40] an mo[n] þenc o[n] heuene blisse
þat hev[er] sal ileste[n] vid outen
misse Q[uod] uob[is] [etc.]

There is blisse buten ende[4]
Jhesu crist us þid[er] sende

lily

Leiden University
Middle English Literature Seminar
2017

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Notes

1 Although Karl Reichl, in his edition of the text, transcribes the “ð”s here as “d”, an observant transcriber in our midst noted the small tick at the top of the letter forms and stated that it was a common way for scribes to write “ð.” Moreover, the context of the line, which is a paraphrase of the biblical quotation (from Deuteronomy) at line 15, offers further support for the letter being a “ð,” since it suggests “worð” is a better reading here than “word.” [Back]

2 The abbreviation is unclear; the letter could be either an “ð” or a “d.” [Back]

3 There is a correction here; an “i”, which had preceded “scriuen” has been erased. [Back]

4 These two lines are written below the rest. [Back]